Singleplayer Games

What are “Single player Games”? Singleplayer games are games that are meant for just one person. Only one person can play that game… all alone… all by themselves. For people that may be socially shy or awkward, don’t speak the majority language for that game or are too young to interact with others, this can be a great thing.

With singleplayer games, there is no need to worry about predators, stalkers, youth seeing nudity, hearing language, being bullied, harassment, verbal abuse, losing content, or having to interact with others. You can just enjoy playing your game without a care in the world. So you really don’t have to worry about much of anything since these games are just for one person.

Just because you may be the only one playing the game, that doesn’t mean there aren’t things to be cautious of. While most negative things about all types of gaming come from some of the actual real-life people on those games, some of the negative things are from the type of games and the types of games for the wrong person.

There are plenty of horror games, games with nudity, language, intense topics, intense scenes, smoking, drugs and alcohol, gambling with real life money, suggestive themes, blood and gore, games that have violence, etc., that are just for one person.

You really need to look at the game’s website, social accounts, videos, pictures, description, tags and especially the reviews. You need to gather all the information on the game you’re thinking about buying, whether for yourself or someone else.

If the game is on Steam, Humble Bundle, or some similar websites; they will show you the description, videos by that company, pictures, user and non-user tags, user reviews, website, company, and social accounts. However, if you’re on the game’s website, they might not show everything you need to know to decide whether to buy the game or not.

The least some game companies will show is a very short sales pitch description, a small amount of pictures (5 at best), a video or two by them, and their social accounts. The most they will show is an informative description, pictures by them and users, user reviews, videos by them and their social accounts. I’m not going to get into the good and bad in gaming and how to tell if the game is good or not in this article, that’s another article.

Now you’d think all games would have a singleplayer mode and then add other modes later. After all, it’s somewhat easier to have players play by themselves and create a new world or file than it is to pay so many dollars a month or year to host a server, have the troubles of getting and keeping the server up, and then having players actually connect to the server. At the beginning, you would think some games will add a Singleplayer mode before they add Co-Op or Multiplayer mode right? WRONG!

There are lots and lots of games that only have Multiplayer mode, Co-Op mode, and any other mode that is not Singleplayer. Some games are just meant for Multiplayer, like MMOs (Massively Multiplayer Online). It is possible to play multiplayer games with more than one person on one computer in the same room, but most people call that Local Multiplayer or Local Co-Op. This allows you to play with someone on the same computer in the same room.

You couldn’t play with someone from Sweden if you’re in the USA on Local Multiplayer or Local Co-Op. You have to go online for that. It’s the same as how you talk to people all over the world from Twitter, Facebook, Discord, Skype, etc., which are all online. If your internet is down, you cannot talk to anyone on those platforms because it’s not online.

There are many different types of games and game modes for different people. You can get a game that is strictly singleplayer or a game that has both singleplayer and multiplayer and just play singleplayer for the time being. Some people like the game and not the multiplayer part so they only play the singleplayer part. I recommend starting with singleplayer and then getting a game later that has both so you can ease into multiplayer versus getting thrown into multiplayer.

What’s the Best Way to Make Money at the Dog Track?

Success at the dog track is measured by how much money you make. It’s as simple as that. If you walk out with less money than you walked in with, you have a problem. If you walk out with more money than you walked in with, on a regular basis, you’re a winner. Of course, we all have our losing days, but you need more winning days than losing ones.

So, what’s the best way to make sure that your bankroll grows rather than shrinks? While there are a lot of different ways to handicap greyhounds, I think that there’s only one way for most people to get to where they can make money at the track almost every time they go. You do it by starting small and building up to making bigger bets.

Your instinct might be to make big, complicated bets – wheeling and keying dogs in trifectas and superfectas. Unless you have very deep pockets, phenomenal luck and fantastic handicapping skills, you’ll lose your shirt. Instead, here’s the best way to win money and keep more of it at the dog track.

Start with win bets. Find the best dog in a race and bet it to win. Use a good handicapping system and don’t bet too many bets on a program. Betting every race is the quickest way I know to empty your pockets and get discouraged. However, DO handicap every race. Play the ones you’re surest of and just watch the rest and see if your pick wins.

No one can pick a winner in every race, I don’t care how good they are at picking dogs. On a program with 10 races, the average beginner should bet no more than 3-4 dogs. Do that until you’re hitting enough so that you’re ahead on almost every program. It’s very important to keep good, written records of your picks. No changing your mind after the race because you would have picked a dog. Be honest with yourself and keep track of your wins.

When you get to where you’re picking enough winners to make a profit on them on a regular basis, increase the amount of your win bets. That’s all there is to making a consistent profit at the track. Once you’ve mastered this, you can go on to quinielas, trifectas and even superfectas. But until you develop your handicapping skills, stick with small win bets on a few races. It’s very hard to do, but worth it in the long run.

The Canterbury Tales: "The Pardoner’s Tale" and Death

Death is often a subject in the works of many great authors. Some personify it and address it directly, others use it as a symbol of endings or the macabre, and still others use it as a general theme throughout. Regardless of how it is used, death is a common subject. Chaucer uses this subject, as well, but skillfully weaves all three characteristics together in one short story. In “The Pardoner’s Tale” by Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pardoner portrays death as a character, symbolism, and a theme to support his sermons about sin.

Death is used as a theme throughout “The Pardoner’s Tale.” From the beginning, death is introduced when a funeral procession carrying a corpse goes by outside the tavern. The three rioters wonder who it is, and one asks a servant, “What cors is this that passeth heer forby” (668). The boy lets them know it is the body of one of their friends, slain by Death (672-677). The sudden death of the friend shows how even a man living high on life can die suddenly. Even an entire village can be wiped out as referenced in lines 686 through 688. No one is safe from eventually dying. A further reference to death in the story is from the old man the rioters come upon while searching. He wants to die, and dramatically claims he knocks on the earth, praying, “Leeve Mooder! Leet me in!” (731), but he still lives on despite his old age. The three young men continue on, and eventually succumb to death as well. From the corpse being carried by, to the final death of the three rioters, it is obvious that death eventually comes to all. Through the Pardoner’s sermons, it seems he feels this statement is true due to the sins man allows himself to live.

The Pardoner interrupts his story with a sermon on the vices of gluttony, drunkenness, gambling, and swearing. In each, he continues the theme of death by alluding to it in regards to each sin. Gluttony is a sin of over indulgence, where the Pardoner focuses on gluttony of food. The stomach and meat are referenced in the sermon, supposedly in a quote of the apostle Paul: “‘Mete unto wombe and wombe eek unto mete:/God destroyen bothe,'” (522-523) stressing that both the stomach and meat are destroyed by God. Even before they are destroyed this way, “he that haunteth swiche delices/Is deed whil that he lyveth in tho vices,” (547-548) meaning those that go to excess might as well be dead as long as they live that way. Connections to death are also made regarding drunkenness as the Pardoner tells about Attila the Hun and his death, saying he was found “Deyde in his sleepe with shame and dishonour,/Bledynge ay at his nose in dronkenesse” (579-580), so his excess of drinking led to his death. The references to death in regards to gambling and swearing are less intense, but still present by alluding to gambling being the “verray mooder” of several sins including manslaughter (591-593), and claims that “homycide” (657) is a “fruyt” (656) of swearing and false oaths. All these are warnings told by the Pardoner in The Canterbury Tales to his traveling campanions, supported by the actions of the young men in the story.

Just as the Pardoner warns of death in connection to these sins, the young men are warned repeatedly of the consequences of their actions in searching out Death. The barman tells them Death “in this contree al the peple sleeth” (676), letting them know that every killing is attributed to Death. No one in the country is excepted. The barman goes on to tell them he feels “it were necessarie/For to bewar of swich an adversarie” (681-682) and that “to been avysed greet wysdom it were,/Er that [Deeth] dide a man a dishonour” (690-691). All this is meant to encourage the rioters to be careful since Death can come to anyone, at any time, for Death is the greatest adversary and thief in all existence. This warning did not affect them, and they rode out. When they encounter the old man on the road and pester him to tell them where to find Death, he also warns them by beseeching, “God save yow” (766); he knows that since they have decided to find Death, only God can save them. Throughout this theme, Chaucer uses death also as symbolism in many ways.

Death is the end to all life, and the symbolism of death in “The Pardoner’s Tale” represents endings, as well. Death symbolizes a fear of an early death which all people share. The servant questioned about the corpse says he was taught by his mother to “beth redy for to meete hym everemoore” (683), because one must always be prepared for death since it can come at any time. The corpse is a strong reminder of that and a direct symbol of unexpected death as he was “yslayn [that nyght]./For dronke as he sat on his bench upright” (673-674), dead while partying that very night, in the prime of life. His life and his drinking end by Death. Just as death ended his life, it is also a strong symbol for the end to the men’s rioting. They leave the tavern to search out Death, just as many people will end their sinful habits when they know death will be coming soon. The difference here is the rioters are actually searching Death out instead of waiting. They end their search when they find the gold, “No lenger thanne after Deeth they soughte” (772), and forget their oath as their greed takes over. Not only does the end of their search represent the death of their oath, but they also find their own death once they end their search: “Thus ended been thise homycides two/And eek the false empoysonere also” (893-894). Death is truly a symbol of endings. Other than death being a symbol itself, there are several elements in the story that symbolize death, as well.

Objects or actions can be symbols of death, either in their significance to it or in their meanings. One direct symbol of death is the gold the rioters find under the oak tree. Not only does the old man tell them specifically they would find Death under that tree (765), but it also symbolizes greed, which the Pardoner expresses is the mother of manslaughter in his sermon on gambling, which can be considered an extension on greed for money or gold. Through this, the money is a symbol of the deaths soon coming to the three young men. The methods of death are also symbols for the sins they commit. One dies by the other two betraying and murdering him for the gold. This death is very appropriate as all three make an oath, “ech of us bicomen otheres brother” (698), to become brothers in their search for Death. When he decides to poison them so he can take all the gold for himself, he betrays his comrades. Satan considers this permission to toy with the man and make him suffer, “the feend foond hym in swich lyvynge/That he hadde leve hym to sorwe brynge” (847-848). Since he betrays in his life, he is killed by betrayal. The symbolism in the deaths of the other two is a different kind, explained by the Pardoner during his lecture on drunkenness, “For dronkenesse is verray sepulture” (558), meaning drunkenness is the true tomb. In the sermon, it is considered the true tomb of man’s wit and discretion, but in the case of the two murderers, it becomes the cause of their death. They drink the win the first had poisoned to kill them and are thus killed by their love of wine. All three of these are symbols of death by being sins that cause death in spirit in the church’s teachings, and death in body for the characters in the story. In clearly connecting the sins to death in his story, the Pardoner turns his tale into a parable encompassing all the sins he views as the most dangerous and least loved by God. Having such a strong example or symbol of how the sins and death are connected strengthens his claims in his sermons. The last symbol of death in “The Pardoner’s Tale” is the old man himself.

The old man the rioters come by in the story is a direct personification of death. He tells the young men, “I knokke with my staf bothe erly and late” (730), describing how death is everywhere at all times. He never rests, day or night. He also says, “moot I han myn age stille,/as longe tyme as it is Goddes will” (725-726), explaining that he must keep his old age for as long as it is God’s will for him to do so. Death is not in control of his own time, but merely continues on as God decrees for all time. He gives veiled references to the underworld when he claims the earth is his “moodres gate” (729). Someone doing the will of the underworld would claim the earth as his mother’s door, which is opened up when a grave is dug to bury the dead. He even threatens the young men, suggesting they might not live as long as he has with a reference of, “if that ye so longe abyde” (747). After telling about himself, he begs leave to go about his way, claiming, “I moot go thider as I have to go” (749), because regardless of what is going on, he must go where he must go to do God’s will. His speech isn’t lost completely on the young men, because they consider him connected with Death. They claim he is his spy (755) and say, “thou art oon of his assent/To sleen us yonge folk” (758-759), accusing him of being in league with Death to kill the young. The barman and servant boy had warned them that Death was a very powerful thief of lives, but they don’t listen to such warnings, and so fail to recognize the entreaty for God to save them as a warning.

In the story, death is personified as a “privee theef men clepeth Deeth” (675), known to all as a powerful and sneaky thief of lives. The barman explains to the rioters that Death is powerful enough to claim an entire town, “Bothe man and womman, child and hyne and page” (688), but the young men refuse to listen. They set out to confront Death personally, thinking to avenge their friend and the townsfolk. They make the combined oath, “we wol sleen this false traytour, Deeth!” (699), and travel to find and kill Death. If they had been told simply that their friend had died of a heart attack, instead of being killed by a sneaky thief with a spear, they would not have set out to destroy such an all powerful thief. However, personifying death into a thief called Death that steals all lives in the country gives the rioters something to pursue in their drunken state. This personification and the resulting search, gives a more solid feeling to the concept of death. When a fact is ethereal in nature, many will dismiss it as though it is as inconsequential as it is insubstantial. In characterizing death as a real character, the Pardoner is making the subject substantial and more of a real threat to his companions. More people will prepare their lives and homes for thieves than for death. Making the two one and the same forces the companions to consider the consequences of ignoring death and the possibility of the end of their lives.

By portraying death as a theme, symbolism, and as a flesh and blood character, the Pardoner strengthens his arguments made in his sermons on sin and encourages his companions to consider preparations for death and avoidance of sin more carefully. His connections in the story back up his lectures. His reasoning for this is made apparent, if they weren’t already, when he ends his story and encourages the other pilgrims to come to him to pardon their sins “for a grote” (945), or for a groat which was a fourpenny coin. He reminds them that at any moment, any one of them might fall off his or her horse and break his or her neck. With that in mind, he tells them it is a good thing he is among them since he has his relics they may kiss for blessings, and pardons signed by the Pope himself (920-922). Having just told them a story about death and the sins that could lead to death, especially greed, he asks they open their purses to absolve themselves of sin through his pardons so they may die, if they die while on the pilgrimage, with a clean soul and a clear conscience. The host does not buy in to the Pardoner’s trick, but tells him he will help him carry his relics so can “be shryned in an hogges toord” (955). Though it is an appropriate response to the Pardoner’s attempt at selling his admittedly fake artifacts, it does not give appropriate tribute to the extent of finesse shown in the tale.

Three Lottery Winners’ Stories

Les Robins, Yancy Hicks, and Jackie Cisneros all share something in common: in addition to being lucky enough to win large amounts of money at the lottery, they’ve all enjoyed successful lives since their big wins. These three winners all exemplify the perfect lottery success story.

Les Robins

Les Robins, at the time a junior high school teacher, won $111 million in a Powerball jackpot in 1993. He founded Camp Winnegator, a 226 acre camp grounds which serves as a day camp to local Wisconsin children. He still visits the campgrounds, and is known to drive around the grounds in his Jeep, to see the status of his charity and enjoy the benefits of his good deeds. He also works as a volunteer basketball coach for another organization.

Les Robins had already identified his passion- as a teacher, he knew that he enjoyed working with kids. So, with unlimited wealth at his disposal, he made a hobby out of the things he enjoyed. As a volunteer basketball coach, he could still work with kids but on a much less rigorous schedule than as a teacher. Creating Camp Winnegator was a way to create a lasting legacy to children.

Yancy Hicks

Mr. Hicks, after working at McDonalds for twenty-six years, won $1 million in 2008. Although this is a smaller sum than many multimillion dollar jackpot winners may have won, he has managed to turn it into a sound investment. Mr. Hicks’ lifelong dream was to own a Subway sandwich shop franchise, so he used his winnings to do so. Despite his great success, he has still managed to stay with the same group of friends as he had before his win. The only splurge purchase he made was a new Corvette.

Yancy Hicks did all the right things. He had already identified his dream- to own his own Franchise. After researching various restaurant franchises, he finally settled on a Subway sandwich shop franchise, well within his budget. Construction began in 2010 and will be completed soon. The lottery win made that possible. In addition, he certainly didn’t splurge on things he didn’t need and was careful with his new earnings. Finally, Yancy Hicks knew to be careful with saying “no” to people. He kept friends that he had made before his win, and didn’t let new people take advantage of him or his wealth.

Jackie Cisneros

In 2010, Jackie Cisneros, an overnight newsroom editor, won $266 million in the Mega Millions lottery. Her husband, Gilbert Cisneros, had purchased the tickets for her on a whim after picking up dinner to bring home. The timing on the win could not have been better- just two weeks prior, Gilbert Cisneros had been laid off from his job. Already a great story, what made it even more compelling and newsworthy was that Jackie Cisneros has kept her job. As she explained it, the job made her happy and she wanted to continue that. She couldn’t imagine a life without working, so of course she would continue to do so.

Jackie Cisneros is another example. She knows the things that make her happy- in her case, working at a job she enjoys which gives her satisfaction. She and her husband have done charity research (They plan to give to their church and to their alma maters) and are thinking about how to give gifts which will make them happy.

Though these three winners are by no means the only people with great lottery winner’s stories, they exemplify some of the success methods that enable one to become one.